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About Mead

The Next Big Thing in Alcohol That You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

Whether you’re a true alcohol aficionado, a devout happy hour goer, or just a weekend sipper, we all want to be up on the next big thing. So as the craft beer craze wanes, the hard seltzer fad goes soft, and the bourbon resurgence recedes, what’s next on the horizon for liquor lovers?

Mead, Alcohol Made from Honey.

The World’s Oldest Alcohol

Mead is an alcoholic beverage made from fermenting honey. Usually this includes honey, water and yeast.

When people hear that mead is made from honey they usually think it will be an overly sweet drink, but that’s not always the case. Mead is one of the most versatile alcohols available. Sugar ferments into alcohol, the more sugar the more alcohol. Honey is incredibly dense with sugar so it makes a great starting point for mead.

The sweetness you might taste in a sweet mead is from the “back-sweetening”. Back-sweetening is adding honey back in after the fermentation is already complete. This allows us to control the sweetness level of mead, if no honey is added back in, then the mead will be very dry with little residual sweetness.

With alcohol percentages ranking from 4% all the way up to 20% for some barrel aged meads, it can be a heavy hitter.

Mead is not Typical

Probably the No. 1 mead fallacy is that there’s essentially one type: super sweet and strong, the kind you might find at a castle gift shop in merry old England. But to call that “typical” mead is like calling a jug of Chianti “typical” wine.

There are dozens of types of mead, including braggot made with both honey and barley malt, cyser made with apples and oxymel made with vinegar !And within each type there are even more varieties that can be concocted with different ingredients, including herbs like thyme and rosemary or fruit like blueberries and oranges.

Mead is on the Spectrum

Mead has a spectrum of sweetness. Because mead is made with honey, people automatically assume that it’s a strictly sweet drink.

However, honeys vary greatly in their sweetness level, as do the yeasts used in mead making, and this impacts the final product’s sweetness.

Differences in the honey’s flavor affect the taste. But the level of sweetness is determined by the fermentation process as well. Often sweeter meads will have honey or other sweeteners added after fermentation.

Mead is on Trend

Mead is Trendy… but more importantly, tasty. While we predict a real mead renaissance over the next few years, we’re pretty sure it won’t be just a passing fancy.

Mead has staying power. (Did somebody say 9,000 years old?) And it’s doubtful the drink that fueled the Vikings’ explorations, the Mayan’s architectural feats, and the Roman empire will fade away any time soon.

That said, don’t try mead for its trendiness—try it for its taste! Order mead delivered to your front door from Yiri Distribution today!

and people
love it!

“…Lou Chalmer, a somm and a winemaker… she’s making this beautiful ambrosia called Yume, which is super-complex and floral. At 6% it’s a really nice low ABV option for people who want to try something a little different….”

BLAZE YOUNG

“…Bartholomews bring traditional winemaking techniques to produce amazing mead with raw Western Australian honey… full bodied mead with a rich honey aroma and flavour. Well balanced, a lovely texture and clean finish…”

NAT BUSSAU

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  • The Next Big Thing in Alcohol That You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

    The Next Big Thing in Alcohol That You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

    Whether you’re a true alcohol aficionado, a devout happy hour goer, or just a weekend sipper, we all want to be up on the next big thing. So as the craft beer craze wanes, the hard seltzer fad goes soft, and the bourbon resurgence recedes, what’s next on the horizon for liquor lovers? Mead, The…